The News Chair
  1. Getting to Know You and Your Business

    August 18, 2015 by Tiffany Whisner

    Lisa Deremiah

    Tiffany Whisner

    Tiffany Whisner

    No matter what business or organization you might be in, there is likely some element of sales or business development involved.

    It’s a job not for the faint of heart. You hear “no” many more times than “yes” — or you may not hear back at all. As far as a personality that works best in this environment, you’ve either got it or you don’t.

    And Coles Marketing’s Lisa Deremiah has it — in spades.

     

    Doing business with people

    Lisa Deremiah

    Lisa Deremiah

    “I always have a list of potential clients I want to get in touch with,” Deremiah said. “I look at specific industries we do well with or want to get more involved with, and I do a lot of research online.” What’s she looking for?

    An outdated website. No social media presence. Lack of media relations. A sales or business development professional will attempt to make a needs assessment even before reaching out to the client or customer.

    “I try to find out who makes the marketing decisions and get them on the phone if possible,” she said. “And if that doesn’t work, I try to capture their email address and reach out to them that way.” But that’s certainly not her ideal situation.

    “Technology has, of course, made some things easier and more efficient, but not everything. It’s definitely harder to get a face-to-face meeting now than it was five or 10 years ago, but I think face-to-face contact is still very important. People do business with people.”

    Once the connection is made, Deremiah gives her pitch, which includes the reason she is calling, a brief background of Coles Marketing’s services and the opportunity to follow up with a meeting.

     

    Positive pieces of business development

    “It’s about follow up and consistency,” she said. “Maybe it’s a brush off, but if I connect with someone who is willing to do a follow-up call or email, that means they might want to work with us in the future.”

    She has other advice for being more effective in a sales or business development position:

    • Be nice. Have a positive attitude on the phone. And make a good first impression in person — be polite, arrive on time, dress properly and have a firm handshake.
    • Listen more. A business relationship is much like a personal relationship. If you don’t click, you’re not going to move forward with the business — so listen to their needs more, and talk about your own accomplishments less.
    • Know your product. “I’m the first impression of Coles Marketing to potential clients, so I have to be knowledgeable about all we do and all we can offer,” Deremiah said.
    • Find out the answers. Go into your initial meeting as more of a fact finder. And if a question is asked you don’t know the answer to, make it a point to find out.
    • Perfect follow-up skills. Whether it’s a handwritten thank you, an email or a phone call, take the time to follow up after your meeting.
    • Offer a helpful tidbit. Part of your follow up can be sending a piece of helpful information — a case study demonstrating how your company has solved a problem; a website to check whether or not their website is mobile friendly; or an article appropriate to their industry.

     

    One step closer to a yes

    And finally, keep your promises. “I do what I say I’m going to do to the best of my ability,” Deremiah said. “That creates trust and lays a positive foundation.”

    What about the frustration of getting all the “no” responses? It’s all part of the job.

    “You have to not let it tear you up,” she said. “That’s why having a positive attitude is so important. Plus, every ‘no’ is one step closer to a ‘yes.’”

    Interested in talking with Lisa about what Coles Marketing can offer your business? Call her at 317-571-0051 ext. 104 or email lderemiah@colesmarketing.com.

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  2. Seafood Makes a Splash in Indy

    August 14, 2015 by Chris Mercier

    email-header-indyFor the second year, Coles Marketing is gearing up for activities and events to celebrate October as National Seafood Month. Indy is one of eight markets chosen to educate Americans about the health benefits of seafood.

    The Seafood Nutrition Partnership conducts grassroots public health educational programs across the country and began with Indianapolis and Memphis in 2014. The other six cities added this year are : Birmingham, Ala.; Charleston, W.Va.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Lexington, Ky.; Oklahoma City, Okla. and Toledo, OH.

    Already, Indy is reaping the benefits of the national health campaign. Shrimp farming in Indiana is being featured at the Indiana State Fair according to this article in NUVO. In addition, Indiana’s aquaculture scene was recently featured on Inside Indiana Business with this interview with Scott Tysen, co-owner of JT Shrimp in Wheatfield, Ind.

    This October, SNP Indy will be offering omega-3 screenings (measures the omega-3 fatty acids in red blood cells) at local health fairs and planning many exciting events. There will also be a few surprises too, so stay tuned!

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  3. King of Content Rules the Internet

    July 20, 2015 by Tiffany Whisner

    web-only-video

    Tiffany Whisner

    Tiffany Whisner

    Globally, consumer Internet video traffic will be 80 percent of all consumer Internet traffic in 2019, up from 64 percent in 2014. The sum of all forms of video will be in the range of 80 to 90 percent of global consumer traffic by 2019, according to the Cisco Visual Networking Index.

    Think about that. Video will be 80 to 90 percent of global consumer Internet traffic in just a few years. Why is video paramount to our online presence?

    Coles Marketing Videographer Shawn Sorrells said video is so popular across Internet traffic on a global level because while “content is king,” video is the king of content.

    “Video can tell a story and capture with it emotion and sincerity,” he said. “And it also gives brands the chance to feature testimonials from a consumer’s viewpoint. Being able to see and hear that personal voice of the consumer is much more believable.”

     

    Easier to create, faster to deliver

    Shawn Sorrells

    Shawn Sorrells

    Aligned with the influence video has is the ease with which you can now create your own video, post it online and share with the masses.

    “Even five years ago, smartphones and other mobile devices weren’t as proficient with handling video as they are today,” Sorrells said. “That’s also true of the speed of your mobile device and of the cellular network you’re using — both are delivering data more quickly and efficiently than ever before.”

    As noted by the Cisco Visual Networking Index, broadband speeds will double by 2019 — reaching 43 Mbps, up from 20 Mbps in 2014.

    With faster speeds and user-friendly video apps for basic effects, consumers can become their own multimedia videographer and editor. But anyone loading video to the Internet still needs to make sure it’s a video worth sharing.

     

    Produce a share-worthy video

    “The video needs to be visually captivating beyond what you see on a day-to-day basis,” Sorrells said. He offered these video production tips:

    • Tell the story: As with any story, there should be a beginning, middle and end.
    • Use proper lighting: Make sure the light is bright enough but the shot isn’t backlit too much. The environment needs to be free of distractions and shadows, and keep people away from walls and windows. It’s better not to use the flash — good natural lighting is best.
    • Make the background interesting: Have a splash of color from a plant, wall painting, etc., to give a little pop without it being the focus.
    • Make the audio a priority: Use a microphone whenever possible, whether it’s a boom, stick, lavalier or handheld mic. And if you only have the onboard mic from your camera or mobile device, get as close as possible to the subject who is speaking.
    • Shoot more video than you need: Having more video will give you more options when editing and more ways to tell your story that you may not discover until after the shooting process.

     

    It’s all about telling the story

    What about once the video is shot? Depending on your operating system, Sorrells suggested iMovie and Windows Movie Maker as some of the best free video editing software applications available.

    “Use a variety of different shots in your video and be precise,” he said. “Every shot has a purpose to help you tell the story and get the message across. And when you’re done, watch it — and have others watch it — before you go live. Because once it’s out there, it’s out there.”

    Coles Marketing’s in-house creative team has the tools and talent for all your photography and video production needs. Learn more!

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