The News Chair
  1. Stop Googling Yourself to See Your Ads

    June 5, 2018 by admin

    The Beginning of a Paid Search Campaign

    Today is an exciting day. You gave the approval for your advertising agency to begin a paid search campaign for your company. You go to your computer and Google your brand name and don’t see your ad within the paid results. You then go to your mobile phone and Google your industry and you see your ad, but it’s ranked #3 in the search results. Your biggest competitor, the thorn in your side, has the ad that shows up at the very top.

    You immediately panic and send an email to your digital buyer asking why your ad isn’t showing for all searches and why it’s running below that of your competitor. You’ve allocated your hard-earned money toward Google search and you expected better results. Your buyer responds with an email telling you both to calm down and that you shouldn’t Google yourself to see your ads.

    I understand that it’s exciting to see your ads and to see proof that the dollars you’re allocating to advertising are running where they’re supposed to. I’ve been placing advertising for my clients for more than a decade and still get a little thrill of pride when I see an ad I’ve placed. However, unlike a billboard on the highway that works to grow awareness among everyone who passes it, paid search ads should only show to people who are actively in-market for information about a product or service. Paid search works because you have a self-selected audience of people who are interested in what you have to offer and are actively researching it. If you go searching for your ads, you are making your campaign less efficient, which may make you pay more per click over the life of your campaign.

    How Google Paid Search Words

    Google search ads are run through an auction, but it’s not a simple “highest bidder wins” kind of auction. The reason for this is that Google only makes money from a search if someone clicks on a paid ad rather than an organic listing. Therefore, it is in Google’s best interest to show the ads people are most likely to click on at the top of the page, with the ads less likely to get clicks further down the page.

    Google accomplishes this by using many factors to rank the ads for each auction, such as your bid amount, your auction-time ad quality (including the expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance and landing page experience) and the context of the search, which includes things such as the device being used and the searcher’s location.

    If you want more information about how Google determines which ads to show, and in what order, click here.

    Experienced search engine marketers will look at your paid search campaigns daily, doing things such as tweaking words in ads, adjusting bids, changing landing pages and refining search terms in order to increase both the clickthrough rate as well as the quality score in the eyes of Google’s machine learning.

    Why Not to Search for Your Own Ads

    This all leads you to why you should stop Googling your ads – you’re not a potential customer looking to make a purchase from them.

    If you have any questions about the keywords and ads being shown in your account, it’s better to ask your digital buyer to pull a sample search from AdWords with the Ad Preview and Diagnosis tool than to Google it yourself. 

    There are few reasons for this, including:

    1. If you’re searching for your ads and they’re not showing, it could be because you searched too many times. Directly from Google, “if you repeatedly look for your own ad using Google search but never click on it, you might stop seeing it entirely. That’s because Google’s system stops showing you ads that it thinks you aren’t interested in.”
    2. Every time your ad gets an impression that doesn’t lead to a click, your clickthrough rate (CTR) is lowered. Clickthrough rate is the ratio of clicks to impressions, so the more impressions you get without clicks, the lower your CTR. Per Google, “By performing searches that trigger your ad, you’ll accumulate impressionswithout clicks, which can lower your clickthrough rate and prevent your ad from appearing as often as it should.” Lower clickthrough rates also decrease the ad quality score, which will cause you to pay more per click for the exact same ad position.
    3. Not only will Google stop showing your ads to your IP address or device when you repeatedly search your ads, but you will be interfering with how and when Google shows your ads to your customers. When a keyword is repeatedly searched but rarely generates a click, Google’s machine learning determines that your ad is not relevant to that search term
      If Google decides your ad is irrelevant, your quality score will decrease, and the ad will show less frequently or not at all.

    If you have any further questions about how Google decides which ads to show in an auction, please reach out to me (cstewart@colesmarketing.com) or the rest of the Coles Marketing team at 317-571-0051. In closing, please stop Googling your company so you can see your ads. You’re only hurting your digital advertising campaign in the long run when you do.

    By Christy Stewart
    Digital Advertising Strategist 

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  2. 5 Q’s with VP of Creative Tim Coulon

    May 8, 2018 by Veronica Lytle

    He’s a Grateful-Dead-listening-dog-loving-daydreamer. Tim Coulon is the VP of Creative at Coles Marketing. He’s been here for more than 17 years and is still cookin’ up creative ideas that make our clients swoon.

     

    1) How do you start your day? Are you a strong coffee/hit-the-snooze button person? Or a lemon water cleanse/yoga up-at-5 a.m. person?

    I start by asking Alexa what the day’s forecast looks like. Always Starbucks in the Keurig. Pep talk with my Labradoodle, Woodford, and kiss the fam goodbye. I’m a huge Grateful Dead fan, so that’s on Sirius Radio for the drive in. NEVER talk radio. The last thing I want to hear in the morning to start my day is other people’s opinions. This routine starts my day off right.

     

    2) Creative types aren’t really known for finding inspiration at their desks. Where do you get inspiration when you need to get the ideas flowing?

     Daydreaming. Yep. Little sessions throughout the day. I have perfected the craft of daydreaming while working. Thinking about upcoming trips, events, etc. I also listen to lots of music. I believe music is a huge part of where I find my inspiration.

     

    3) You spearheaded a lot of creative projects over the years. What’s one that’s surprised you the most? Like, “leap out of your seat fist-pound” proud?

    I’ve had so many projects throughout the years, it’s hard to rack my brain. But one that sticks out was for the Humane Society of Hamilton County. Not only did I love the way the project came out, I also directed one of our most successful photoshoots (plus I got to hang out with puppies all day). Nothing bad about that. And these dogs and cats finally found their forever home. Take a look and see the design. It’s clean. Cheerful. Fresh.

    4) Trends. Trends. Trends. Give us your graphic design predictions for the year. What’s hot? We want to know! 

     First off, traditional design will never go out of style. Helvetica will never become a passé typeface. Simple has and will always be the better choice. And good typography always goes a long way.

    To me, trends are just variations on the simple and traditional. When designers get bored, they try something new. And if it looks good, someone else will see it and use some form of it. Bam … new trend. I will say simple flat graphics/icons are currently hot now. So are bold, big typefaces and colors. But give it a minute, it will change. Who knows what the next day will bring.

     

    5) Finally, what advice can you give to clients who are just starting to create a brand/look for their company? Where should they start?

    Don’t try to do it on your own. Hire an experienced professional to help. The name, look and story of your brand speaks volumes. It sets the tone for your plunge into the marketplace. Be open to the ideas of the professionals. Remember, they’re professional for a reason.

    Clients often look at their own brand from within the fishbowl. Since professionals are outside of the fishbowl, they can develop the brand with the customer in mind, while staying true to the core of the client.

     

    Thanks Tim! Contact Tim at tcoulon@colesmarketing.com if you have questions about all things creative or just to talk shop.

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  3. Advertising Healthcare in the Digital Age

    March 7, 2018 by Sam Watermeier

    What is the first thing you do when you’re feeling under the weather? You probably hop on the internet to research your symptoms, right?

    These days, people do their homework before scheduling any kind of medical appointment. When they have a medical issue, they tend to start combating it online. In fact, one in every 20 searches on Google is healthcare-related, and those who are in-market for services tend to gather information on Google before taking any action.

    Cyberspace is the place to be when it comes to connecting with potential patients. Although you can certainly catch consumers’ eyes with billboards on the highway and ads in the local newspaper, you have an even better chance of grabbing their attention online.

    When we steer new healthcare clients toward digital advertising, they often worry about their companies getting lost in the clutter of online information. Are you hesitant to make the leap into the digital world? Let’s dive in together and look at the benefits of digital advertising. 

    The Measurability of Digital Advertising

    Traditional marketing methods, such as billboards or television commercials, don’t always produce tangible results.

    With digital advertising, you can access analytics that show you how ads are performing and what kind of progress you’re making. You can see …

    • The demographics you’re reaching
    • What time of day the ads are reaching the most people
    • How many users are clicking on the ads
    • The amount of conversions — the number of users taking actions to become patients (filling out contact forms, calling the medical office, scheduling appointments, etc.)
    • The cost per conversion 

    Here’s a sample of a report from our digital advertising strategist Christy Stewart that shows the positive results of the Facebook display ads and Google search ads we created for one of our healthcare clients.

    As you can see, this report shows a significant increase in conversions and website traffic coming directly from our digital advertising efforts.

    The measurability of digital advertising helps our healthcare clients refine their strategies, defend their marketing budgets and determine what is giving them the best return on investment.

    Standing Out in Cyberspace

    One of the main concerns we hear from healthcare companies is the worry that they will fail to stand out online. But with digital advertising, we can …

    • Target specific audiences
    • Zero in on your market by geographic location (a.k.a. “geotargeting”)
    • Reach the top of search listings
    • Turn off the ads that aren’t performing well to save room in the budget for the ads yielding positive results

    “It’s easy to be nimble with digital advertising. You can change your ads with the click of a mouse.” — Christy Stewart, Digital Advertising Strategist

    The bottom line is that when people are scrolling through content on their computers and smart phones, they’re frequently looking for a health organization like yours. All you have to do is put yourself out there for them to find. And after collaborating with several healthcare clients on digital advertising, we can assure you that this is one of the most effective ways to boost your business.

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